Will AI Replace Writers?, by Matt Weber
The capabilities of artificial intelligence have grown by leaps and bounds in the past half-decade. Some of this is driven by improvements in algorithm design, some by hardware, but the results are on the Internet for just about anyone to see: Facebook’s face recognition and Apple’s autocomplete are both supported by neural networks. And AI […]
New Developments in Space Exploration – and Seven Stories to Create from Them, by William Boyd
Space. Spaaaaaaaaaaace. Space is the absence of things.  Humans, composed as we are of matter and living as we do on the surface of a massive ball of the stuff and blanketed by miles of atmosphere, only know short lives of matter and small distances. Space is the antithesis of all these things.  Devoid of […]
Reviews: the Good, the Bad, and the Necessary, by Jordan Elizabeth
When my first book, ESCAPE FROM WITCHWOOD HOLLOW, came out in 2014, I talked about it constantly.  Family, friends, and coworkers were happy (I assume they were happy!) to buy a copy.  Whenever I sold one to them, I asked that when they were done, they leave a review. They would lift their eyebrows at […]
8 Tips on How to Write Credible Family Characters, by Helena Halme
Most characters in a story will have a family member featuring at least in a minor role in the plot. But how should you write them to make them credible? All characters need to be credible A character in a script, a novel or novella needs to have a personality, inner conflicts, outer conflicts, nuance […]
The Culture of Now – A Writer Mom’s Teaching Moment, by J. Lynn Else
Has anyone else noticed that we’re living in a culture of “now?”  My daughter will often say something at home to the effect of: “Mommy, I’d like to learn to knit.”  Typically, my response would be, “that sounds like a fun idea.”  She will then reply with, “I want to learn now.”  And when she […]
The Big Ol’ Book Convention, by Jordan Elizabeth
Oftentimes, readers or other authors will ask me why I don’t frequent a lot of “big” book conventions. I have done some in the past and I plan to do more in the future, but I’m going to be honest here – I sell more books at intimate gatherings, like libraries and craft fairs. “That’s […]
The Humanity (and Inhumanity) of Laughter, by Benjamin Sperduto
There’s a memorable passage in Robert Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land in which the main character “discovers” that humans don’t laugh at things because they’re funny, but rather because they’re tragic. Every incident of humor he describes occurs at someone’s expense, a recognition of physical or emotional suffering. We laugh, he says, at the […]
Interview with Fairfax Library Foundation’s Director of Development Abigail Fine., by Alisa Gus
This weekend, a number of CQ authors will be attending the Fairfax Library Foundation’s Barnes & Noble Bookfair. This event wouldn’t be possible without Fairfax Library Foundation’s Director of Development Abigail Fine, who met CQ managing partner Alisa Gus, when she entered a Twitter pitch event. Alisa faved the pitch, requested the full (at which […]
The Villains You Find In Online Writing Groups, by Jordan Elizabeth
I’ve taught numerous creative writing and “how to get published” classes at local libraries.  I always stress the importance of getting feedback on your work.  The paragraph might sparkle on your computer screen.  You’ve never been more proud of anything you’ve ever written.  You read it ten times, it is just amazing…and then someone else […]
How To Write Villains, by Astrid Kaniele
As I begin to edit a novel I’ve left alone for a few months, I’ve been thinking about my villainous characters a lot. See, there are more than I expected and they are all there at different points in the story for different reasons. There’s no way I could merge three into one. Let’s introduce […]