Happy September, everyone! For most people, school has started up again (or is about to), and summer is drawing to a close. With a couple of months until Halloween, there’s not much to celebrate right now, but we at CQ find any excuse for a slice of cake (or three!).

So we’d like to raise our glasses, and give three cheers to the authors born in September!

 

karenSeptember 1 - Karen Kincy

Karen Kincy (Kirkland, Washington) can be found lurking in her writing cave, though sunshine will lure her outside. When not writing, she stays busy gardening, tinkering with aquariums, or running just one more mile. Karen has a BA in Linguistics and Literature from The Evergreen State College.

Karen’s Clockwork Menagerie: A Shadows of Asphodel Novella is out today, and she shares a birthday with main character Konstantin. Check out Karen’s birthday giveaway here: https://curiosityquills.com/book-release-clockwork-menagerie/

 

 

Emma AdamsSeptember 10 - Emma L. Adams

Emma spent her childhood creating imaginary worlds to compensate for a disappointingly average reality, so it was probably inevitable that she ended up writing speculative fiction. She was born in Birmingham, UK, which she fled at the first opportunity to study English Literature at Lancaster University. In her three years at Lancaster, she hiked up mountains, skydived in Australia, and endured a traumatic episode involving a swarm of bees in the Costa Rican jungle. She also entertained her creative writing group and baffled her tutors by submitting strange fantasy tales featuring dragons and supernatural monsters to workshops. These included her first publication, a rather bleak dystopian piece, and a disturbing story about a homicidal duck (which she hopes will never see the light of day).

Now a reluctant graduate, Emma refuses to settle down and be normal. When not embarking on wild excursions and writing fantasy novels, she edits and proofreads novels for various publishing houses and reads an improbable number of books. Emma is currently working on the Alliance series, a multiple-universe adult fantasy featuring magic, monsters, cool gadgets and inappropriate humour. Her upper-YA urban fantasy Darkworld series is published by Curiosity Quills Press.

Book four in Emma’s Darkworld Series, Demon Heart, is out October 19, 2015!

 

250px-D_H_Lawrence_passport_photographSeptember 11 - D.H. Lawrence

David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D. H. Lawrence. His collected works, among other things, represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. In them, some of the issues Lawrence explores are emotional health, vitality, spontaneity and instinct.

 

 

 

Roald_DahlSeptember 13 - Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl (13 September 1916 - 23 November 1990) was a British novelist, short story writer, poet, screenwriter, and fighter pilot.

Dahl’s short stories are known for their unexpected endings and his children’s books for their unsentimental, often very dark humour. His works for children include James and the Giant Peach, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda, The Witches, Fantastic Mr Fox, The BFG, George’s Marvellous Medicine, and The Twits. Adult works include Tales of the Unexpected and My Uncle Oswald.

 

 

Dame-Agatha-Christie-poets-and-writers-35812657-942-1280September 15 - Agatha Christie

Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, DBE (née Miller; 15 September 1890 - 12 January 1976) was an English crime novelist, short story writer, and playwright. She also wrote six romances under the name Mary Westmacott, but she is best known for the 66 detective novels and 14 short story collections that she wrote under her own name, most of which revolve around the investigative work of such characters as Hercule Poirot, Jane Marple, Parker Pyne, Harley Quin/Mr Satterthwaite, and Tommy and Tuppence Beresford. She also wrote the world’s longest-running play, The Mousetrap. In 1971, she was made a Dame by Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace for her contribution to literature.

 

 

Stephen_King,_ComiconSeptember 21 - Stephen King

Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of contemporary horror, supernatural fiction, suspense, science fiction, and fantasy. His books have sold more than 350 million copies, many of which have been adapted into feature films, miniseries, television shows, and comic books. King has published 54 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman and six non-fiction books. He has written nearly 200 short stories, most of which have been collected in book collections. Many of his stories are set in his home state of Maine.

 

 

September 21 - H.G. Wells

Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 - 13 August 1946), known primarily as H. G. Wells, was a prolific English writer in many genres, including the novel, history, politics, and social commentary, and textbooks and rules for war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels, and Wells is called the father of science fiction, along with Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback. His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), and The War of the Worlds (1898).

 

 

Christine BakerSeptember 23 - Christine Baker

Christine Baker has been writing on and off for twenty years. Her most loyal fans include her two Shih Tzu, Tonks and Darwin. Whenever she’s writing, there’s sure to be snackems around. She currently resides in the dusty town of Winnemucca, Nevada, and one day hopes to live where there are real trees (The kind with leaves, not needles) where she can ride her motorcycle year round. Her husband Jeramie has yet to complain of less than appetizing meals when she’s on a roll, and her three boys know when to tip-toe through the house.

Christine’s short story, Lana’s End, is available now in the Gears of Brass Anthology.

 

Andrea BerthotSeptember 24 - Andrea Berthot

Andrea Berthot’s last name has a silent “t,” like the word “merlot” - which fits, since that is her favorite drink to have at the end of the day.

Back when she was born in Salina, Kansas, her last name was Price, and she grew up loving singing, acting, reading, and of course writing. By day she teaches high school English, creative writing, forensics, and directs the yearly musical, and by night (or rather, by early morning, as her brain is more alive at 5am than 5pm) she writes Young Adult stories involving history, romance, magic, literature, and some good, old-fashioned butt-kicking.

She lives in Winfield, Kansas with her husband and their two sons, Maximus and Leonardo

Andrea’s novel, The Heartless City, is available now.

 

Jessica_Gunn_Author-Pic-for-CQSeptember 24 - Jessica Gunn

Born in Connecticut and raised on science-fiction and fantasy, it was inevitable Jessica Gunn would end up writing novels. She spent most of high school binge-watching a plethora of “old” and current sci-fi shows before diving into fanfiction. Jessica wrote her first novels in high school.

In college, Jessica studied anthropology where she learned enough about ancient civilizations and flintknapping to inspire GYRE, her first published novel. But being honest, daydreams of Atlantis and other ancient mysteries have captivated her for over a decade.

Jessica now lives as a continuous student of the writing craft in small-town Connecticut. She remains an avid fan of stories of the wormhole and superhero variety. Oh, and villains. She loves villains. When not working or writing, she can be found attending to her ever-growing TBR pile and hiking the forests of New England.

To catch up with Jessica, follow her on Twitter (@JessGunnAuthor) or on her website, www.jessicagunn.com.

Jessica’s novel, Gyre, is scheduled for release February 2016.

 

F_Scott_Fitzgerald_1921September 24 - F. Scott Fitzgerald

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 - December 21, 1940) was an American author of novels and short stories, whose works are the paradigmatic writings of the Jazz Age. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century. Fitzgerald is considered a member of the “Lost Generation” of the 1920s. He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby (his best known), and Tender Is the Night. A fifth, unfinished novel, The Love of the Last Tycoon, was published posthumously. Fitzgerald also wrote many short stories that treat themes of youth and promise along with age and despair.

 

 

Carl_Van_Vechten_-_William_FaulknerSeptember 25 - William Faulkner

William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 - July 6, 1962) was an American writer and Nobel Prize laureate from Oxford, Mississippi. Faulkner wrote novels, short stories, a play, poetry, essays, and screenplays. He is primarily known for his novels and short stories set in the fictional Yoknapatawpha County, based on Lafayette County, Mississippi, where he spent most of his life.

Faulkner is one of the most celebrated writers in American literature generally and Southern literature specifically. Though his work was published as early as 1919, and largely during the 1920s and 1930s, Faulkner was relatively unknown until receiving the 1949 Nobel Prize in Literature, for which he became the only Mississippi-born Nobel laureate. Two of his works, A Fable (1954) and his last novel The Reivers (1962), won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked his 1929 novel The Sound and the Fury sixth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century; also on the list were As I Lay Dying (1930) and Light in August (1932). Absalom, Absalom! (1936) is often included on similar lists.

 

Thomas_Stearns_Eliot_by_Lady_Ottoline_Morrell_(1934)September 26 - T.S. Eliot

Thomas Stearns Eliot OM (26 September 1888 - 4 January 1965), usually known as T. S. Eliot, was an essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic, and “one of the twentieth century’s major poets”. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri, to the old Yankee Eliot family descended from Andrew Eliot, who migrated to Boston, Massachusetts from East Coker, England in the 1660s. He emigrated to England in 1914 (at age 25), settling, working and marrying there. He was eventually naturalised as a British subject in 1927 at age 39, renouncing his American citizenship.

Eliot attracted widespread attention for his poem The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock (1915), which is seen as a masterpiece of the Modernist movement. It was followed by some of the best-known poems in the English language, including The Waste Land (1922), The Hollow Men (1925), Ash Wednesday (1930), and Four Quartets (1945). He is also known for his seven plays, particularly Murder in the Cathedral (1935). He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948, “for his outstanding, pioneer contribution to present-day poetry.”