About Wild Children

Bad children are punished. Be bad, a child is told, and you’ll be turned into an animal, marked with your crime.

The Wild Children are forever young, but that, too, can be a curse.

Five children each tell a different story of what they became:

  • One learns that wrong can be right, and her curse may be a blessing.
  • Another is so Wild he must learn the simplest lesson, to love someone else.
  • An eight year old girl must face fear and doubt as she dies of old age.
  • Love and strangeness hit the lives of two brothers in the form of a beautiful flaming bird.
  • Finally, the oldest child learns that what is right can be horribly wrong.

Together they tell a sixth story, of a Wild Girl who can’t speak for herself, and doesn’t seem Wild at all.

Reviews for Wild Children

Wild Children is definitely unique, and it’s one of the most unique books I’ve read. What’s interesting about Wild Children is that it’s a book where I wasn’t sure if I liked it or if it was just okay while I was reading it…but something I really liked when I finished because I saw how five different stories came together to tell one story. I didn’t love it, but it’s still a book that I really like. Wild Children gets 4 stars."

StarStarStarStarStar(4/5 Stars)
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What I love about the book is the discussion about the Wild Children. The trials itself was ok, but I did like the discussion about whether the Wild Children were evil and a temptation, or angels (especially for dove children) or even just kids given a second chance. Almost every character has a different opinion and no definitive answer is ever given.

Apart from this, there's also a very interesting narrative of the discrimination against the Wild Children. It really makes you visualise why people who look different are often discriminated against.

The only thing I didn't like was that Bray instantly [...]

StarStarStarStarStar(5/5 Stars)
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What I love about the book is the discussion about the Wild Children. The trials itself was ok, but I did like the discussion about whether the Wild Children were evil and a temptation, or angels (especially for dove children) or even just kids given a second chance. Almost every character has a different opinion and no definitive answer is ever given.

Apart from this, there's also a very interesting narrative of the discrimination against the Wild Children. It really makes you visualise why people who look different are often discriminated against.

The only thing I didn't like was that Bray instantly [...]

StarStarStarStarStar(5/5 Stars)
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We are never told what the sin is or why the children take on some level of animal characteristics but when the book ends it leaves the possibility of another beginning and, possibly, a sequel.

Robert’s prose is lean and flowing and he successfully captures the different voices of each character’s perspective whilst still maintaining a cohesive voice for the entire book.

I loved this book and I’m looking forward to reading more from this talented author."

StarStarStarStarStar(5/5 Stars)
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